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Thread: YOUNG ADULTS SPEND MORE THAN SIX HOURS PER DAY FEELING ‘STRESSED OUT’

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    YOUNG ADULTS SPEND MORE THAN SIX HOURS PER DAY FEELING ‘STRESSED OUT’

    YOUNG ADULTS SPEND MORE THAN SIX HOURS PER DAY FEELING ‘STRESSED OUT’, FINDS MENTAL HEALTH STUDY

    GEMMA FRANCIS

    Young adults spend more than six hours a day "stressed out", a study has found.

    A poll of 1,000 18-25-year-olds found money, appearance and career worries as well as fears about the future mean a large chunk of their time is spent feeling anxious or under pressure.

    But one in 10 feel they have no-one to turn to discuss their concerns, leaving them to face their fears alone.

    A further 67 per cent admitted they had come across problems in their life where they felt they had nobody to lean on for help.

    As a result, 56 per cent have ended up in more trouble after keeping a problem to themselves rather than confiding in someone else.

    The statistics emerged in a study by charity, UK Youth, to launch its #KeepMeSafe campaign, which calls on all organisations working with young people to "look" at their safeguarding policies, "listen" to young people and take action during National Safeguarding Month.

    “It’s concerning to see just how long young people spend feeling worried or stressed and how many of them have to go through these issues alone, without anyone to turn to for advice and guidance," a spokesperson for the charity said. “Despite living in our ever-connected world, young people need safe spaces more than ever.

    “For many, their local youth club is the only place that provides them with a trusted adult to confide in and access to the advice, support and guidance needed to feel safe and build bright futures.

    “But to stop young people feeling worried or stressed in a society where issues of grooming, online peer pressure, extremism and hate crimes are rising, many youth services need to be supported with additional safeguarding resources and training."

    The study found money worries are the biggest cause of young adults’ stress followed by fears about their future.

    Concerns about their weight and overall appearance, as well as their health completed the top five. Getting a job, achieving a good work/life balance and getting onto the properly ladder are also among the common stresses young people have.

    But despite spending such a huge amount of time feeling concerned, the average young adult has just four people they feel they could turn to for help.

    Despite those aged 18 to 25 having an average of 165 friends on social media, 85 per cent still had moments where they feel lonely.

    More than 40 per cent thought social media added to their worries and stress, while more than half of those said it leaves them feeling under more pressure to keep up with everyone.

    Twenty-nine per cent said they struggle with the lack of privacy, 40 per cent said they feel as pressured to impress others and 33 per cent feel like they need to make their lives sound better than it really is.

    But researchers found that even those who do have someone they can approach with a problem, do not always get the help they need with more than half admitting they had felt ‘fobbed off’ or ignored by someone, while 68 per cent find it difficult to share problems in the first place.

    This leads to more than six in 10 respondents being more likely to battle on alone than go to anyone else if they have a problem or need advice.
    Much more.

    It's hard to know what's going on here and the word choices don't help much. All young people worry about the future, their appearance or social skills, and jobs/money. I doubt that has changed much.

    Social media probably exaggerates concerns about appearance or lifestyle but it doesn't create them.

    I'm pretty sure every adolescent ever believes that he or she can't confide in adults or is constantly 'blown off' when they do manage to articulate an existential or transient concern.

    What's worrying is that the article wants to fix this by creating "stay safe" policies everywhere. Worrying about friends or jobs or status isn't a life-threatening issue requiring intervention and policies. It's a life stage.

    Eventually, you learn to drop worries: they aren't your friends, you have to ask for money or walk, you will never lose those five pounds but your blood pressure rocks, your spouse isn't perfect but neither are you, yes, your child is only average in both looks and talent but that's not important, etc.

    Then you acquire other worries that normally either have solutions you can implement or have no solutions in which case excessive worry isn't useful. Either way, just not being 20 solves a lot of problems.

    Are young people more worried and do they have fewer helpful adults or friends or do they just focus more on problems?

    Independent

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    I don't think this is news. I can't speak for females, but as a young male, when puberty rolled around, yes, I was stressed. Testosterone will do that to you.

    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by 80zephyr View Post
    I don't think this is news. I can't speak for females, but as a young male, when puberty rolled around, yes, I was stressed. Testosterone will do that to you.

    Mark
    Estrogen is as bad or worse. I got stretch marks on my hips and I was appalled. I wasn't even fat. My body just went insane when I was 14/15.

    I also believed that I was badly misunderstood, too elevated for my actual life, and had "insights" that were relevant and important.

    I didn't.

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    I certainly found the effects of testosterone stressful, and they weren't even happening to me directly. I was just in the fallout zone.
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    Social media. Avenues to complain and amplify.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Marva View Post
    Social media. Avenues to complain and amplify.
    Exactly!

    I can only assume that those of us on the forum are well adjusted normal human beings who take regular breaks from our phones/computers/tablets to live in the real world, so we don't experience the 24/7 bubble that these kids live in online. That bubble magnifies everything that we went through as kids x1000 because it's such an echo chamber and it's completely un-policed by adults.

    Everything that kids go through at school and with their friends, all the drama and bullying and hormones and whatnot is just cranked up for younger people. Add in political activism and it's all that much worse. And they are total addicts, so they cannot break away due to FOMO — fear of missing out.

    I gotta wonder what the long term effects of that kind of stress is doing to still-developing minds. Personally, when I get burnt on something, I take a break. I do it here, I do it on Facebook, I do it with politics, and family. (OK, maybe with family it's the opposite — I begrudgingly visit relatives just to let them know I'm still alive, once in a blue moon.)

    On a more snarky note, I'd be stressed too if I was the generation that was going to have to clean up the mess of life that the boomers and Gen X made of things.
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    Well, they aren't going to 'clean up' anything any more than any generation has repaired what it thinks are the excesses the of previous generations. There are some efforts; some of which appear to work (but don't), some of which solve the wrong problems, and some of which actually make problems worse.

    Expanding the social "bubble" that kids live in has obviously not helped.

    I think there's probably a very bright line between people who grow up having constant in-person social interactions (good and bad) and people who grow up with screens.

    I'd guess that screen interactions make kids more fragile emotionally. In real encounters, you have to negotiate and physically "read" intent which involves a bunch of stuff that you test all the time in childhood and adolescence. Or did.

    Screens prevent that. You aren't in the moment and don't have to negotiate socially - you just leave if you "feel" uncomfortable. You can't use most of the designed emotional detection systems we all actually have to illuminate expression, intention, seriousness, or play.

    For someone my age this isn't a big deal because I do have all that long history of 'meat-time', social negotiation, sibling corrections, real life competition, etc.

    For people who primarily engage via screens using texting and social media - their experience of the world is different and probably way more difficult in a lot of ways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Expanding the social "bubble" that kids live in has obviously not helped.

    I think there's probably a very bright line between people who grow up having constant in-person social interactions (good and bad) and people who grow up with screens.

    I'd guess that screen interactions make kids more fragile emotionally. In real encounters, you have to negotiate and physically "read" intent which involves a bunch of stuff that you test all the time in childhood and adolescence. Or did.

    Screens prevent that. You aren't in the moment and don't have to negotiate socially - you just leave if you "feel" uncomfortable. You can't use most of the designed emotional detection systems we all actually have to illuminate expression, intention, seriousness, or play.
    Agree. Having to know how to talk to a real live human in real English..................................'nuff said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    ...

    It's hard to know what's going on here and the word choices don't help much. All young people worry about the future, their appearance or social skills, and jobs/money. I doubt that has changed much.

    Social media probably exaggerates concerns about appearance or lifestyle but it doesn't create them.

    I'm pretty sure every adolescent ever believes that he or she can't confide in adults or is constantly 'blown off' when they do manage to articulate an existential or transient concern.
    I'd say "possibly." We were in school at least 6 hours/day, so I'm pretty sure that, if anyone had cared to ask, we would have said we felt "stressed out" for 6 or more hours daily. Social media may intensify social concerns - or at least concerns about being publicly dissed - but it also opens additional avenues of support. During the year she was out of school (and many social events) due to RA, HRH connected online with other kids with chronic illnesses. And quickly became disenchanted with the "poor me" websites where people defined themselves by their disabilities. I suspect that experience speeded up her transition from being pitiful and mad at the world to being resilient and figuring out how she could do what she loved to do without hurting herself.

    The internet is a bit like alcohol or recreational pharmaceuticals: its behavioral effects are little more than an expression of the user's underlying personality.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Much more.

    It's hard to know what's going on here and the word choices don't help much. All young people worry about the future, their appearance or social skills, and jobs/money. I doubt that has changed much.

    Social media probably exaggerates concerns about appearance or lifestyle but it doesn't create them.

    I'm pretty sure every adolescent ever believes that he or she can't confide in adults or is constantly 'blown off' when they do manage to articulate an existential or transient concern.

    What's worrying is that the article wants to fix this by creating "stay safe" policies everywhere. Worrying about friends or jobs or status isn't a life-threatening issue requiring intervention and policies. It's a life stage.

    Eventually, you learn to drop worries: they aren't your friends, you have to ask for money or walk, you will never lose those five pounds but your blood pressure rocks, your spouse isn't perfect but neither are you, yes, your child is only average in both looks and talent but that's not important, etc.

    Then you acquire other worries that normally either have solutions you can implement or have no solutions in which case excessive worry isn't useful. Either way, just not being 20 solves a lot of problems.

    Are young people more worried and do they have fewer helpful adults or friends or do they just focus more on problems?

    Independent

    I already knew about this listening to my niece and her friends. I don't completely get it either. It might be social media, but it's also college advisers having them take way too many classes at once. When I was her age, five was the limit when earning a BA and that was pushing it. These advisers push seven or eight classes. And if you want a job when you leave college, you need to work and get experience, so that's added pressure.

    They feel they have nobody to talk to because they're being blown off as "snowflakes," sometimes by older people who might not be working a full time job themselves.

    And maybe they were taught less coping skills, but who raised them?

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