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Thread: YOUNG ADULTS SPEND MORE THAN SIX HOURS PER DAY FEELING ‘STRESSED OUT’

  1. #11
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    I don't think social media and screens should take all of the blame for the youngsters in the UK feeling that they can't cope with what looks like life. But they can take a good chunk of it.

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    I don't think social media and screens should take all of the blame for the youngsters in the UK feeling that they can't cope with what looks like life. But they can take a good chunk of it.
    I can't really address that with any degree of knowledge. I thought being a teenager in the UK looked pretty grim when I saw it through the not-always-reliable lens of Hollywood in "To Sir, With Love." Perhaps it's more so now; perhaps social media contributes. Perhaps the Brits are just genetically unhappy. I just don't think we can generalize from a study in the UK to an entire generation. Certainly not the kids I know, not your grandkids as far as I can tell, not Philly's nieces and nephews, not Scott's kids, not the children or grandchildren of my colleagues. They all have social media and use it to varying degrees, but they also do sports, dance, do their school work, and either talk to their parents or talk to me or you or Philly.

    We were all going to be clueless idiots because we spent too much time (as a generation) watching TV and listening to lewd and/or druggie music. My aunt's generation was being ruined by rock'n'roll. God knows what kind of mischief my parents' generation would've gotten into if they hadn't been salvaged by a brutal war and turned into saints.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    I can't really address that with any degree of knowledge. I thought being a teenager in the UK looked pretty grim when I saw it through the not-always-reliable lens of Hollywood in "To Sir, With Love." Perhaps it's more so now; perhaps social media contributes. Perhaps the Brits are just genetically unhappy. I just don't think we can generalize from a study in the UK to an entire generation. Certainly not the kids I know, not your grandkids as far as I can tell, not Philly's nieces and nephews, not Scott's kids, not the children or grandchildren of my colleagues. They all have social media and use it to varying degrees, but they also do sports, dance, do their school work, and either talk to their parents or talk to me or you or Philly.

    We were all going to be clueless idiots because we spent too much time (as a generation) watching TV and listening to lewd and/or druggie music. My aunt's generation was being ruined by rock'n'roll. God knows what kind of mischief my parents' generation would've gotten into if they hadn't been salvaged by a brutal war and turned into saints.
    Yes, I just watched that movie...where's Mr Thackeray when you need him?!

    I meant to finish my last sentence with "here in the US". I have no idea why UK kids are so bummed out. You always here how the rest of the world is so much happier than we are here that it is surprising.

    Just observing kids...and adults...with their cell phones in most any setting, it's easy to see that they are a sizable distraction. The phones are an extension of their hands. I'm not an expert on the subject either but I believe it has to take away from the personal relationships that are developed between family, friends and community. And while I don't think it affects every young person who worries about the 20 items on the UK list, I think it must be a reason for a lot of their angst in life. But maybe not...I'm open to other reasons too.

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    Yes, I just watched that movie...where's Mr Thackeray when you need him?!

    I meant to finish my last sentence with "here in the US". I have no idea why UK kids are so bummed out. You always here how the rest of the world is so much happier than we are here that it is surprising.

    Just observing kids...and adults...with their cell phones in most any setting, it's easy to see that they are a sizable distraction. The phones are an extension of their hands. I'm not an expert on the subject either but I believe it has to take away from the personal relationships that are developed between family, friends and community. And while I don't think it affects every young person who worries about the 20 items on the UK list, I think it must be a reason for a lot of their angst in life. But maybe not...I'm open to other reasons too.
    Think about the "distraction" aspect. Not that teens need anything at all to be distracted, but my grandfather used to kvetch about the amount of time my teen-aged aunt spent on the only telephone. He was sure it encouraged smart-mouthing and ignoring her elders, and distracted her from her homework. My high school counselor complained that the slang used in our school was like a different language, and she suspected the purpose was to exclude adults from our conversations (she was at least partly right). My best friend's mother claimed we played the music loudly to shut out our parents and siblings (duh!). And then the way we danced! The old folks couldn't even tell who was dancing with whom, since we just stood around the dance floor and shook and writhed to the "music." (And then they wished they had encouraged that once we discovered "slow drag." )

    The phones are a status symbol, and a convenience, and no doubt a distraction. But we don't know what all those kids are doing on their phones. At least 3 of them are sharing e-books on my Amazon Kindle account, since their parents don't read. HRH is playing Scrabble with a kid in Missouri. Kids who know each other IRL use Instagram the way we passed notes in class, only more so. When we moved from the Shore to DC in '68, my friends and I wrote letters at first and were VERY RARELY allowed to talk long-distance (briefly), but we started losing touch fairly quickly. HRH has moved across the country and maintains relationships with friends from as far back as kindergarten.

    My parents were frantic when one of us was on the road in bad weather. HRH turns on GPS and Nova and I can watch her drive home. The other night, my phone blue-screened while I was on a late-night (11 o'clock being "late" for me) burger run. I had to navigate home the old-fashioned way (ask at a gas station). When I got home, HRH was practically in hysterics, because she couldn't reach me or track me. She had called the restaurant! We're no longer accustomed to the uncertainty that must have driven my poor parents nuts (ok, I know it did), but that's not limited to kids.

    Every new technology has the potential to isolate people, but most can also bring people together. Hell, my mom was sure it would hurt my social life to drive myself to school (before I got my license, guys were always offering me rides, or we all took the bus together). Somebody had to pick Honoria and Nova up after their extracurriculars, though, so I drove...and my social life survived.
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