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Thread: Will children at center of college admissions scandal pay a price along with their parents?

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    Will children at center of college admissions scandal pay a price along with their parents?

    Will children at center of college admissions scandal pay a price along with their parents?
    By ALENE TCHEKMEDYIAN
    MAR 14, 2019 | 8:35 AM

    Will children at center of college admissions scandal pay a price along with their parents?

    Their parents face criminal charges, with federal prosecutors alleging massive fraud to get them into some of America’s most elite schools.

    But it’s still unclear what is going to happen to the children who were the beneficiaries of what prosecutors called the largest college admissions scam ever uncovered.

    Federal prosecutors allege cheating on standardized tests, bribery and faking athletic achievements to get into college — the types of misdeeds that would lead to serious discipline. But in many cases, they said, the students did not know about the arrangements their parents made.

    Administrators at UCLA and USC said this week they are reviewing student admission decisions after discovering that dozens of families paid huge sums to gain access to at least eight exclusive schools, including theirs, through bribes and lies. Among the parents charged were Hollywood actresses Felicity Huffman, of “Desperate Housewives,” and Lori Loughlin, of “Full House.”

    A USC spokesman said Wednesday that students who applied for admission in the current cycle — which is underway for fall admits — and are tied to the scheme will be denied admission. That includes about half a dozen applicants.

    The school will also conduct a case-by-case review for current students and graduates who may have taken part in the scheme.

    “We will make informed, appropriate decisions once those reviews have been completed,” USC spokesman Eddie North-Hager said in a statement.

    UCLA said that it would consider canceling admissions if any student was found to have lied in an application.

    “If UCLA discovers that any prospective, admitted or enrolled student has misrepresented any aspect of his/her application, or that information about the applicant has been withheld, UCLA may take a number of disciplinary actions, up to and including cancellation of admission,” the university said.

    The two schools have already fired or suspended coaches and an administrator accused in the case.

    USC’s senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and men’s and women’s water polo coach Jovan Vavic were fired after allegedly receiving bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC, even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.

    UCLA has placed men’s soccer coach Jorge Salcedo on leave. Salcedo has been charged with conspiracy to commit racketeering after allegedly accepting $200,000 in bribes for his role in facilitating the enrollment of one female student and one male student to the school under the pretense of being soccer players even though they did not play the sport competitively.

    UCLA said in the statement that it is not aware of any current student-athletes under suspicion.

    “The university is cooperating with the Department of Justice and will conduct its own review to determine the proper steps to take to address this matter,” it said.

    Federal investigators have charged 50 people in the case, which has heightened the debate about the advantages the ultra-rich enjoy in accessing the country’s best colleges amid intense competition in which merit alone is not enough to assure admission, even for students with perfect grade-point averages and stellar resumes.

    The scheme, which began in 2011, centered on the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.

    William “Rick” Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College & Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States. Singer cooperated with authorities and pleaded guilty to the charges in Boston on Tuesday afternoon.

    The president of Wake Forest University said in a statement that a student who was taken off the wait list after her parents allegedly used Singer to bribe a volleyball coach was admitted to the school and is currently enrolled.

    “We have no reason to believe the student was aware of the alleged financial transaction,” Nathan O. Hatch said.

    It’s not the first time some of these universities have been ensnared in cheating scandals involving privileged students.

    In 2005, Walmart heiress Elizabeth Paige Laurie returned her USC degree after she was accused of paying a fellow college student $20,000 to do her homework.

    The move came nearly a year after Laurie’s freshman-year roommate, Elena Martinez, told the ABC newsmagazine “20/20” that she had written term papers and done assignments for the heiress for more than three years.
    Slightly different take on this mess.

    I assume the kids will pay a price - at least those with parents dumb enough to be caught. While embarrassing, I doubt it will harm their future incomes. Few at this level of cheating will be applying as straight candidates for any future job. They may not get the coveted the Yale work permit but whatever they have will be sufficient to secure whatever job they get.

    I see in another article that some heat is getting focused on legitimate "admissions counselors" so I assume this will trickle down when the stories run out of "name" parents.

    I didn't know about the Walmart heiress scandal but I find it amusing. Not that she did it (thousands do this constantly) but that her partner in crime doesn't seem to have had any negative repercussions.

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    I posted about this in a different thread. I don't think it will blow over as easily as you suggest.

    USC has said it will boot out students caught up in this scandal, and is looking into past students and graduates, too.

    Parents and others are losing their jobs. Olivia whats-her-name lost a major advertiser supporting her YouTube biz.

    Three things about this scandal:
    1. It's easy to understand;
    2. It matters to a whole lot of people struggling to get in the old fashioned way;
    3. the arrogance and hypocrisy is excriciating. Very little sympathy will be offered.
    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

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    Ummmmmmmmmmmm………………. methinks prolly not, as long as they're getting passing grades. Institutions like student money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman View Post
    I posted about this in a different thread. I don't think it will blow over as easily as you suggest.

    USC has said it will boot out students caught up in this scandal, and is looking into past students and graduates, too.

    Parents and others are losing their jobs. Olivia whats-her-name lost a major advertiser supporting her YouTube biz.

    Three things about this scandal:
    1. It's easy to understand;
    2. It matters to a whole lot of people struggling to get in the old fashioned way;
    3. the arrogance and hypocrisy is excriciating. Very little sympathy will be offered.
    I'm not sure I have a lot of faith in institutions investigating themselves. I don't doubt that some people will be affected. Particularly entertainment people since their 'social credit' has been in a downward spiral for a couple of years.

    I'm just not sure any lasting change will happen since schools are so dependent on courting future and current donors (which has happened for centuries now).
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    I'm not sure I have a lot of faith in institutions investigating themselves. I don't doubt that some people will be affected. Particularly entertainment people since their 'social credit' has been in a downward spiral for a couple of years.

    I'm just not sure any lasting change will happen since schools are so dependent on courting future and current donors (which has happened for centuries now).
    The institutions of course merely want the outrage to subside. They will fire & expel as many as it takes in the short run to dampen the flames. They all have endowments that can endure almost anything except climate change.

    We were out tonight with a couple who argued pretty well that three things made this particular scandal inevitable. I'll do the LIST=1 thing again:
    1. The amoral sense of entitlement of these sleaze balls;
    2. the fact that athletic departments are havens for weak academic performers;
    3. the fact that Title IX (and other things?) requires many slots/scholarships be set aside that colleges simply can't fill legitimately.

    In the short run this scandal will bite pretty deep. I just heard that ersatz crew member Olivia's mom has lost her Hallmark job because of this. All the productions she was in have been halted. Olivia of course lost the cosmetic sponsor of her YouTube cuteness, and will be expelled from USC, it appears.

    They must be having some great family time just now.

    The only long run positive I can think of, beyond the obvious but faint hope that merit is restored as a genuine value, not just a hypocritical ruse, is that second tier schools will benefit from having NOT participated in this scam.

    Personally, I think fraudulent schools like Harvard, whose reputation rests on its reputation, in effect, and its entree into the power elite—Harvard should suffer a loss in prestige commensurate with its complicity in this travesty.
    Last edited by Newman; Thursday, March 14th, 2019 at 11:14 PM.
    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman View Post
    The institutions of course merely want the outrage to subside. They will fire & expel as many as it takes in the short run to dampen the flames. They all have endowments that can endure almost anything except climate change.

    We were out tonight with a couple who argued pretty well that three things made this particular scandal inevitable. I'll do the LIST=1 thing again:
    1. The amoral sense of entitlement of these sleaze balls;
    2. the fact that athletic departments are havens for weak academic performers;
    3. the fact that Title IX (and other things?) requires many slots/scholarships be set aside that colleges simply can't fill legitimately.

    In the short run this scandal will bite pretty deep. I just heard that ersatz crew member Olivia's mom has lost her Hallmark job because of this. All the productions she was in have been halted. Olivia of course lost the cosmetic sponsor of her YouTube cuteness, and will be expelled from USC, it appears.

    They must be having some great family time just now.

    The only long run positive I can think of, beyond the obvious but faint hope that merit is restored as a genuine value, not just a hypocritical ruse, is that second tier schools will benefit from having NOT participated in this scam.

    Personally, I think fraudulent schools like Harvard, whose reputation rests on its reputation, in effect, and its entree into the power elite—Harvard should suffer a loss in prestige commensurate with its complicity in this travesty.
    Title IX doesn't begin to explain the male fake athletes.

    I suspect that a lack of ambition/interest in attending mom and/or dad's school of choice may go a long way to explain why the spots had to be bought in the first place, so maybe the intended beneficiaries of this scam aren't all that broken up about being booted.
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    Well, companies don't necessarily hire graduates based on their degrees anyway. It's the "who you know" bit over-riding.

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