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Thread: Rural Employment (Injuh)

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    Rural Employment (Injuh)

    We should look into this.


    National Rural Employment Guarantee Act 2005 (or, NREGA No 42, later renamed as the "Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act", MGNREGA), is an Indian labour law and social security measure that aims to guarantee the 'right to work'.

    It aims to enhance livelihood security in rural areas by providing at least 100 days of wage employment in a financial year to every household whose adult members volunteer to do unskilled manual work.[1][2]

    The act was first proposed in 1991 by P.V. Narasimha Rao.[3] , it was finally accepted in the parliament and commenced implementation in 625 districts of India. Based on this pilot experience, NREGA was scoped up to cover all the districts of India from 1 April 2008.[4] The statute is hailed by the government as "the largest and most ambitious social security and public works programme in the world".[5] In its World Development Report 2014, the World Bank termed it a "stellar example of rural development".[6]

    The MGNREGA was initiated with the objective of "enhancing livelihood security in rural areas by providing at least 100 days of guaranteed wage employment in a financial year, to every household whose adult members volunteer to do unskilled manual work".[7] Another aim of MGNREGA is to create durable assets (such as roads, canals, ponds and wells). Employment is to be provided within 5 km of an applicant's residence, and minimum wages are to be paid. If work is not provided within 15 days of applying, applicants are entitled to an unemployment allowance. Thus, employment under MGNREGA is a legal entitlement.

    MGNREGA is to be implemented mainly by gram panchayats (GPs). The involvement of contractors is banned. Labour-intensive tasks like creating infrastructure for water harvesting, drought relief and flood control are preferred.[citation needed]

    Apart from providing economic security and creating rural assets, NREGA can help in protecting the environment, empowering rural women, reducing rural-urban migration and fostering social equity, among others."[8]

    The law provides many safeguards to promote its effective management and implementation. The act explicitly mentions the principles and agencies for implementation, list of allowed works, financing pattern, monitoring and evaluation, and most importantly the detailed measures to ensure transparency and accountability.[citation needed]

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    There's less use for unskilled manual labor here in rural areas (which are also miles and miles apart compared to India).

    We don't usually chop down scrub with machetes - we use bush hogs. We don't shovel out ditches and small irrigation canals - we use compact excavators. Flood control here uses heavy equipment. We use backhoes or excavators to dig shallow wells but a drilling rig to dig deep Western wells.

    Trails use manual labor to create and maintain them but hardly anybody lives within 3 or 4 miles of them. Fewer and fewer crops are harvested by hand unless it's your own garden of an acre or two.

    There's a lot of manual labor to running a family ranch or farm and outside help is hired but the work isn't steady. It's more like hire somebody for a week to repair fencing and they wouldn't live within walking distance anyway (unless it was neighbor teens).

    Manual labor programs here are better suited to urban areas. Picking up trash, dealing with human waste, removing graffiti, etc. People could walk or take a bus to the job site.

    I know there was a program like this aimed at the homeless population but it was a failure because less than half signed up (in a small area) and they had to be supervised too much.

    In rural India, you can actually starve or be denied medical care if you have no employment but there are no such motivations here now.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    There's less use for unskilled manual labor here in rural areas (which are also miles and miles apart compared to India).

    We don't usually chop down scrub with machetes - we use bush hogs. We don't shovel out ditches and small irrigation canals - we use compact excavators. Flood control here uses heavy equipment. We use backhoes or excavators to dig shallow wells but a drilling rig to dig deep Western wells.

    Trails use manual labor to create and maintain them but hardly anybody lives within 3 or 4 miles of them. Fewer and fewer crops are harvested by hand unless it's your own garden of an acre or two.

    There's a lot of manual labor to running a family ranch or farm and outside help is hired but the work isn't steady. It's more like hire somebody for a week to repair fencing and they wouldn't live within walking distance anyway (unless it was neighbor teens).

    Manual labor programs here are better suited to urban areas. Picking up trash, dealing with human waste, removing graffiti, etc. People could walk or take a bus to the job site.

    I know there was a program like this aimed at the homeless population but it was a failure because less than half signed up (in a small area) and they had to be supervised too much.

    In rural India, you can actually starve or be denied medical care if you have no employment but there are no such motivations here now.
    I was thinking they would work in the fields and cleaning up highways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    I was thinking they would work in the fields and cleaning up highways.
    Well, some crops are still picked but less and less as automation and robotics develop. There's no hand picking wheat, corn, soy, sorghum, oats, etc. No weeding by hand. No soil prep.

    If by "cleaning up highways" you mean trash removal - that's mostly handled by community-service people or volunteers or local governments. Weed control is usually by the county or property owners depending on situation.

    Repairing actual highways is always by government. Regardless of whether their efforts are excellent or awful.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Well, some crops are still picked but less and less as automation and robotics develop. There's no hand picking wheat, corn, soy, sorghum, oats, etc. No weeding by hand. No soil prep.

    If by "cleaning up highways" you mean trash removal - that's mostly handled by community-service people or volunteers or local governments. Weed control is usually by the county or property owners depending on situation.

    Repairing actual highways is always by government. Regardless of whether their efforts are excellent or awful.
    Weed is hand trimmed. ETA- For the next six months or so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Novaheart View Post
    Weed is hand trimmed. ETA- For the next six months or so.
    Well, here it is but you actually have to have a permit and training, pass a background check, and report your taxes.

    And live in a city. All the legal weed is hydroponic.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    If by "cleaning up highways" you mean trash removal - that's mostly handled by community-service people or volunteers or local governments. Weed control is usually by the county or property owners depending on situation.
    I thought that's what chain gangs were for? That's who cleans highways here.
    Elect a clown — expect a circus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Servo View Post
    I thought that's what chain gangs were for? That's who cleans highways here.
    Is your state as filthy as Texas? By far the most roadside litter in the nation.
    If it pays, it stays

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Servo View Post
    I thought that's what chain gangs were for? That's who cleans highways here.
    Uh....no. Really, a lot of it is done by community service crews or volunteers (not all by any means) so no shotguns, reflective sunglasses, or soapy jail bait types.

    Sadly.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Uh....no. Really, a lot of it is done by community service crews or volunteers (not all by any means) so no shotguns, reflective sunglasses, or soapy jail bait types.

    Sadly.
    Same here. We have some that litter. The problem in a snow state is that the litter accumulates for 5 months hidden and after breakup it seems to be everywhere. We have adopt a highway systems here where groups adopt a section of the highway and clean it up after breakup. Our community does it as a community gathering because you have to drive 3.1 miles through a park just to get to us. So we clean up the park road as well.
    If it pays, it stays

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