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Thread: Food up

  1. #1
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    Food up

    Price of food is going to go up, if it isn't already. How much? Common sense with all the flooding and food crops ruined in the middle of the country.

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    My brother and I have been talking about this of late. Corn is going to be considerably more expensive this year, and I expect some feed stocks are probably going to be a good bit more expensive, thus increasing down-line costs. Not sure by how much, though. I suppose that will depend a good bit on how big the crops are in non-affected areas. Pretty good time to be a corn-grower in Illinois and Kentucky, I suppose.
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    This has certainly happened many times before but I bet few of us can remember the last 'corn crisis' unless we were growing it or invested in it.

    There will be some downstream increases in meat and chicken prices at grocery stores but both can and will shift to cheaper finishing feeds. Corn is used so much in animal feed because it is cheap here but neither cattle/pigs nor chickens evolved to be corn-dependent.

    It's also worth remembering that not all corn-growing areas are affected. Plenty of other areas grow perfectly fine feed and table corn - it just comes on a bit earlier or a bit later. Some have already made the decision to switch to corn for this year even though some other crops are normal for those areas. Local cooperatives will adjust.

    Farmers in the affected areas will (or already have) switched to later-start crops like beans. Farmers are way more flexible and market savvy than city people and some pundit types may think.

    And next year is a brand new year.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    This has certainly happened many times before but I bet few of us can remember the last 'corn crisis' unless we were growing it or invested in it.

    There will be some downstream increases in meat and chicken prices at grocery stores but both can and will shift to cheaper finishing feeds. Corn is used so much in animal feed because it is cheap here but neither cattle/pigs nor chickens evolved to be corn-dependent.

    It's also worth remembering that not all corn-growing areas are affected. Plenty of other areas grow perfectly fine feed and table corn - it just comes on a bit earlier or a bit later. Some have already made the decision to switch to corn for this year even though some other crops are normal for those areas. Local cooperatives will adjust.

    Farmers in the affected areas will (or already have) switched to later-start crops like beans. Farmers are way more flexible and market savvy than city people and some pundit types may think.

    And next year is a brand new year.
    We had so much rain the first part of the Spring (which I enjoyed) that our farmers Olathe Sweet sweet corn came up looking kind of anemic. But I think all it did was to slow it up a bit because it looks nice and dark green now. Like you said, it will just come in a bit later.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    We had so much rain the first part of the Spring (which I enjoyed) that our farmers Olathe Sweet sweet corn came up looking kind of anemic. But I think all it did was to slow it up a bit because it looks nice and dark green now. Like you said, it will just come in a bit later.
    This Spring has been extremely snowy/rainy for this time of year all down the Eastern Slope of the Rockies. It's set my gardening back quite a bit but the soybean people are thrilled. As always, some will lose and some will gain.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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