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Thread: How Mount Everest’s popularity turned fatal

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    How Mount Everest’s popularity turned fatal

    Cheap vacation to Live dangerously ……………...

    read:https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.028d2651c810

    KATHMANDU, Nepal — Chatur Tamang was on his way to the roof of the world when he hit a traffic jam.
    Ahead of him, on the final ascent to Mount Everest, he saw more than 100 people bunched together on the narrow ridge that leads to the summit — a place so high that it is known as the “death zone,” where the human body has trouble functioning.

    Some of those descending from the summit pleaded desperately with those ascending to clear a way for them to pass since they had run out of oxygen. “That sent chills down my spine,” said Tamang, 45, a mountaineering guide who lives in Russia. He fears that if no action is taken, the crowds next year could be worse, with potentially fatal consequences.
    At least 11 people died trying to reach the summit of the world’s tallest mountain this year, the deadliest climbing season for the peak in four years. One factor contributing to this year’s toll appears to have been crowding as scores of people attempted to ascend in a short window of good weather, producing delays that extended the time climbers spent at deadly altitudes.
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    Mt. Everest has proven deadly. These climbers took on the challenge anyway


    Nobukazu Kuriki died May 21, 2018 during his eighth attempt to climb Mount Everest, this time with only one finger.

    Now officials in Nepal are reviewing whether to change the way access to Everest works. Some experts say that the government should extend the climbing season in May or implement certain requirements for climbers, a number of whom lack experience or sign on with companies offering bargain-priced expeditions.

    Nirmal Purja, an accomplished climber who is attempting to summit 14 peaks worldwide within seven months, was on his way down from the summit at Everest when he decided to stop and photograph the scene behind him. It was unusually cold, he said, and extraordinarily crowded.

    “I’ve seen traffic, but not this crazy,” said Purja, who has summited Everest four times. Purja is among those who believe that the solution is to lengthen the traditional climbing season at Everest to spread out the climbers attempting to reach the summit.
    Continued at link

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    Quote function not working ......

    Cheap vacation to Live dangerously ……………...
    Didn't see any mention in the article about "cheap" or any other cost of climbing Everest.
    If it pays, it stays

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    Climbing Everest runs about $30,000 for a Nepalese company, about $45,000 for a Western company, and can go a lot higher so it isn't cheap.

    The problem is that some companies take on climbers who shouldn't be anywhere near that mountain. They lack experience and they aren't fit enough or have medical conditions that complicate the climb. Some people seem okay but begin to develop issues shortly out of base camp. Companies have a really hard time turning back people who have already paid thousands.

    An awful lot of contemporary climbers simply lack the skills. They could never make the summit on their own even with the ropes and ladders that are installed every season. They just couldn't do it without a lot of guides and sherpas. Some of them are all but dragged up and down. That's a lot of the problem.

    Extending the season is iffy. It could relieve some congestion but the weather window is very narrow. Some of the worst disasters on the mountain have happened when the weather turned suddenly.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Climbing Everest runs about $30,000 for a Nepalese company, about $45,000 for a Western company, and can go a lot higher so it isn't cheap.

    The problem is that some companies take on climbers who shouldn't be anywhere near that mountain. They lack experience and they aren't fit enough or have medical conditions that complicate the climb. Some people seem okay but begin to develop issues shortly out of base camp. Companies have a really hard time turning back people who have already paid thousands.

    An awful lot of contemporary climbers simply lack the skills. They could never make the summit on their own even with the ropes and ladders that are installed every season. They just couldn't do it without a lot of guides and sherpas. Some of them are all but dragged up and down. That's a lot of the problem.

    Extending the season is iffy. It could relieve some congestion but the weather window is very narrow. Some of the worst disasters on the mountain have happened when the weather turned suddenly.
    Since congestion is such a problem Everest needs to be the "Crown Jewel" of Himalayan expeditions. Work up the ladder, then when you've conquered K2 you get a shot at Everest - unguided.
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

    link

    Time will tell.

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    Bargain

    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbit View Post



    Didn't see any mention in the article about "cheap" or any other cost of climbing Everest.
    a number of whom lack experience or sign on with companies offering bargain-priced expeditions.
    Suppose "bargain" is cheap in the eye's beholder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Climbing Everest runs about $30,000 for a Nepalese company, about $45,000 for a Western company, and can go a lot higher so it isn't cheap.

    The problem is that some companies take on climbers who shouldn't be anywhere near that mountain. They lack experience and they aren't fit enough or have medical conditions that complicate the climb. Some people seem okay but begin to develop issues shortly out of base camp. Companies have a really hard time turning back people who have already paid thousands.
    *************Money always talks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    Since congestion is such a problem Everest needs to be the "Crown Jewel" of Himalayan expeditions. Work up the ladder, then when you've conquered K2 you get a shot at Everest - unguided.
    That's an interesting proposition.

    All of the routes to the summit are very well known at this point and today we have exquisitely detailed, virtually real-time views. Most of the routes are not technical climbs. Really, it's the sheer altitude that's the challenge. If the main route from base camp to the summit was at 14,000 ft, they'd have a Starbucks up there.

    But the altitude is a challenge. So many attempt it now because there are fairly robust support services available at base camp as well as services supplying oxygen, water, food, etc. If people had to pack in and manage all that themselves, few would try.

    That, in turn, would sort of crash the sherpa economy as well as the tourist industry on the way to the mountain. Plenty of people trek slightly up the base of the mountain to just to meet climbers and sort of bask in the reflected glory stuff. Not to mention the money the governments make from all the permits.

    Still, it's an interesting idea.

    They could probably make more money someday offering flights around the mountain instead of climbs. Plenty of people would pay handsomely to do that but there are a lot technological challenges to beat before that could happen.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    That's an interesting proposition.

    All of the routes to the summit are very well known at this point and today we have exquisitely detailed, virtually real-time views. Most of the routes are not technical climbs. Really, it's the sheer altitude that's the challenge. If the main route from base camp to the summit was at 14,000 ft, they'd have a Starbucks up there.

    But the altitude is a challenge. So many attempt it now because there are fairly robust support services available at base camp as well as services supplying oxygen, water, food, etc. If people had to pack in and manage all that themselves, few would try.

    That, in turn, would sort of crash the sherpa economy as well as the tourist industry on the way to the mountain. Plenty of people trek slightly up the base of the mountain to just to meet climbers and sort of bask in the reflected glory stuff. Not to mention the money the governments make from all the permits.

    Still, it's an interesting idea.

    They could probably make more money someday offering flights around the mountain instead of climbs. Plenty of people would pay handsomely to do that but there are a lot technological challenges to beat before that could happen.
    Hence the "work your way up" angle. Still need lots of sherpas and support to climb the other ones.

    On edit:

    Keep the partial climb meet on the mountain vibe and charge for it. In fact, it makes that more valuable.
    Last edited by scott; Thursday, June 13th, 2019 at 10:00 PM.
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

    link

    Time will tell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    Hence the "work your way up" angle. Still need lots of sherpas and support to climb the other ones.

    On edit:

    Keep the partial climb meet on the mountain vibe and charge for it. In fact, it makes that more valuable.
    Oh, no kidding on the supply issues for the other ones. I'm sure the attempts for the Seven Sisters would drop like a rock if all the supply/guidance stuff went away.

    But I'm not sure if the groupies would show up for just 5 people a year. Maybe they would, maybe that would be 'even more special'. Who knows?
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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