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Thread: People from Kansas City are roasting McDonald's UK for debuting a burger it says was inspired by the city

  1. #1
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    People from Kansas City are roasting McDonald's UK for debuting a burger it says was inspired by the city

    Basically a double cheeseburger. Where is McDonalds recipe development kitchen located? Illinois? Seems like that ought to be close enough to now the difference. Maybe UK people have to test the sauce.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/mcdo...-burger-2019-6

    Kansas City is known for its slow-cooked, sauced-up barbecued meats, and not for its burgers.
    So when McDonald's UK released a Kansas City-inspired burger on Tuesday, apparently bemused city natives stormed Twitter to roast the fast-food chain.
    The Kansas City Stack is a double quarter-pounder with cheese, bacon, and "a smoky steakhouse sauce" and has nothing to do with the city, according to residents posting on Twitter.

    Neither does the word "Yeehaw," which McDonald's used to herald the arrival of the burger.

    Pictures at link

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    I'd guess they were going for an association with the sauce.

    Everybody knows there is no such thing as BBQ hamburger. You can dump BBQ sauce on a hamburger (and some do) but the meat itself can't be BBQ. It's like "BBQ" chicken (which is very tasty). It's just roasted chicken with a BBQ-flavored sauce.

    I mean, it isn't worth arguing over or being outraged. I BBQ stuff and BBQ people have enough to argue about as it is. Years ago I simply decided to refuse to discuss BBQ with Mr. Snaps. He's from Minnesota of all places. There is nothing he knows about BBQ that is relevant.

    He is capable of producing a tasty brisket but I assume that's a side-effect of hanging around with my brothers. The guy couldn't turn out a decent rack of ribs with a gun to his head.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    There was a local barbecue place when I lived in the City, and my favorite thing there was called "Memphis shoulder." Now, I don't know from barbecue; my family thought it was what people did to make palatable the cuts of meat that nobody who could afford better would eat. I never had barbecue until I moved to SF. So whether Hog Heaven's "Memphis shoulder" bore any resemblance to actual Southern bbq shall remain a mystery (as they are no longer in business). What I do know is that it was damned good.

    What I also know is that putting bbq sauce ON meat is a waste of both. The meat needs to be cooked slowly IN the sauce. Do not try to persuade me otherwise. This is an article of faith.
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    To me, BBQ is a technique. Sure, the rubs and sauces are tasty and worth the effort but the cooking style is where the magic happens and it can only happen with relatively tough cuts that have some degree of marbling.

    So, not chicken, fish, ground meat, etc. That stuff can be BBQ flavored but not really BBQ'd in any serious way.

    Shoulder is sort of an ideal cut. As is, it's horrifyingly tough. It's essentially dog food. 6 or 8 hours being very slow cooked over a decent fire (or using wood chips in a smoker) and it's tender and delicious. The sauce just bumps up the deliciousness.

    Another good way to make use pork shoulder is chili. Let that sucker rip in a slow cooker for 12 hours with some spices and enjoy chili or tamales.

    Otherwise, a pretty useless cut in my opinion. I guess you could grind it up for something.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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