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Thread: Making yogurt

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Marva View Post
    Doesn't count the labor, repeatability, quality control testing or utilities costs. Or the costs of self-life testing. Or the costs or packaging.
    You said cheaper couldn't be done, you never stipulating duplicating a mass-production for sustained retail.
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Marva View Post
    Doesn't count the labor, repeatability, quality control testing or utilities costs. Or the costs of self-life testing. Or the costs or packaging.
    Have you ever successfully made food from scratch in your own kitchen?

    Your utilities are already paid for whether you cook or not. Your quality control happens instantly in the bowl of a spoon or at the end of a fork. There is no shelf-life testing since most people don't store completed recipes for months outside of a freezer. Your "packaging" costs are also already built-in costs (assuming you own a pan or a bowl).

    Labor is a function of value/money. If you spent 15 minutes making yogurt it is unlikely that you would ordinarily be paid for those 15 minutes outside of your normal working hours. Your value is in the quality of the finished product which far exceeds what most people could afford to buy ready-made. There's also value in the pleasure of creating something unique and tailored to your own tastes.

    You may find no value in this kind of creativity and skill building. Fair enough. Spend those minutes watching TV or playing with a phone - nobody is paying you for that either and professional TV producers or cellphone developers probably know a lot more about TV and phones than you could hope to know.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    You said cheaper couldn't be done, you never stipulating duplicating a mass-production for sustained retail.
    Never going to make any product as a one-off cheaper than what is manufactured in quantity.
    What is the purpose of manufacturing something of human food grade in quantity? Feed it to pigs?

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post

    Your utilities are already paid for whether you cook or not. Your quality control happens instantly in the bowl of a spoon or at the end of a fork. There is no shelf-life testing since most people don't store completed recipes for months outside of a freezer. Your "packaging" costs are also already built-in costs (assuming you own a pan or a bowl).

    Labor is a function of value/money. If you spent 15 minutes making yogurt it is unlikely that you would ordinarily be paid for those 15 minutes outside of your normal working hours. Your value is in the quality of the finished product which far exceeds what most people could afford to buy ready-made. There's also value in the pleasure of creating something unique and tailored to your own tastes.
    Then the utility cost should be pro-rated. Control at the end of a spoon will not guaranteed reproducibility for a mass market. A pan or a bowl is not going to be suitable packaging for a grocery shelf.
    Quality of the finished product? Entirely subjective. Not reproducible in the hundreds or thousands of units. Pretty sure the FDA and likes of the USDA aren't going to be favorable with a spoon stuck in every jar to taste something being sold.
    But of course the point is deliberately being missed so as to defend personal cooking practices. Which of course makes "superiority".

    Also makes for something someone can do when they have are rich enough. Someone living in extreme poverty is not going to spend the money for ingredients to make white bread when it can be purchased for a dollar or be gotten from a food bank.

    ******* whatever floats someone's boats********** False claims, included.

  7. #25
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    Never going to make any product as a one-off cheaper than what is manufactured in quantity. Might have fun with it. Taste better? Maybe. Doughtful better over products tasted by panels of multiple people. But hey, if there's nothing better to do in life, go for it.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Marva View Post
    Then the utility cost should be pro-rated. Control at the end of a spoon will not guaranteed reproducibility for a mass market. A pan or a bowl is not going to be suitable packaging for a grocery shelf.
    Quality of the finished product? Entirely subjective. Not reproducible in the hundreds or thousands of units. Pretty sure the FDA and likes of the USDA aren't going to be favorable with a spoon stuck in every jar to taste something being sold.
    But of course the point is deliberately being missed so as to defend personal cooking practices. Which of course makes "superiority".

    Also makes for something someone can do when they have are rich enough. Someone living in extreme poverty is not going to spend the money for ingredients to make white bread when it can be purchased for a dollar or be gotten from a food bank.

    ******* whatever floats someone's boats********** False claims, included.
    There is no mass market for homemade yogurt or soup or cakes - that's the entire point of this thread.

    This thread isn't about taking a recipe to a commercial kitchen and then peddling it to some grocery store. How difficult can this concept be?
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    There is no mass market for homemade yogurt or soup or cakes - that's the entire point of this thread.

    This thread isn't about taking a recipe to a commercial kitchen and then peddling it to some grocery store. How difficult can this concept be?
    Apparently, very.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
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  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Marva View Post
    What is the purpose of manufacturing something of human food grade in quantity? Feed it to pigs?
    Mailing address?
    Get off the cross, we need the wood.

  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    There is no mass market for homemade yogurt or soup or cakes - that's the entire point of this thread.

    This thread isn't about taking a recipe to a commercial kitchen and then peddling it to some grocery store. How difficult can this concept be?
    Head, meet brick wall.
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Have you ever successfully made food from scratch in your own kitchen?

    Your utilities are already paid for whether you cook or not. Your quality control happens instantly in the bowl of a spoon or at the end of a fork. There is no shelf-life testing since most people don't store completed recipes for months outside of a freezer. Your "packaging" costs are also already built-in costs (assuming you own a pan or a bowl).

    Labor is a function of value/money. If you spent 15 minutes making yogurt it is unlikely that you would ordinarily be paid for those 15 minutes outside of your normal working hours. Your value is in the quality of the finished product which far exceeds what most people could afford to buy ready-made. There's also value in the pleasure of creating something unique and tailored to your own tastes.

    You may find no value in this kind of creativity and skill building. Fair enough. Spend those minutes watching TV or playing with a phone - nobody is paying you for that either and professional TV producers or cellphone developers probably know a lot more about TV and phones than you could hope to know.
    I typed this response almost verbatim and decided she wouldn't understand it.

    GMTA
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

    link

    Time will tell.

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