Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: 19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,591
    Post Thanks / Like

    19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women

    19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women

    Some that save time, some that save lives, and a few that make each day a whole lot easier.

    • Amanda Green






    Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.


    Necessity isn't the only mother of invention. Though it wasn't always easy to get patents or the credit they deserved, women are responsible for many items we use today.
    1. The Paper Bag

    America got a brand new paper bag when cotton mill worker Margaret Knight invented a machine to make them with a flat square bottom in 1868. (Paper bags originally looked more like envelopes.) A man named Charles Annan saw her design and tried to patent the idea first. Knight filed a lawsuit and won the patent fair and square in 1871.
    2. Kevlar

    Lightweight, high-tensile Kevlar—five times stronger than steel—will take a bullet for you. DuPont chemist Stephanie Kwolek accidentally invented it while trying to perfect a lighter fiber for car tires and earned a patent in 1966.
    3. The Foot-Pedal Trash Can

    Lillian Gilbreth improved existing inventions with small, but ingenious, tweaks. In the early 1900s, she designed the shelves inside refrigerator doors, made the can opener easier to use, and tidied up cleaning with a foot pedal trash can. Gilbreth is most famous for her pioneering work in efficiency management and ergonomics with her husband, Frank. Two of their 12 children, Frank Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth, humorously wrote about their home/work collaborations in the book Cheaper by the Dozen.
    4. Monopoly

    Elizabeth Magie created The Landlord's Game to spread the economic theory of Georgism—teaching players about the unfairness of land-grabbing, the disadvantages of renting, and the need for a single land value tax on owners. Fun stuff! Magie patented the board game in 1904 and self-published it in 1906. Nearly 30 years later, a man named Charles Darrow rejiggered the board design and message and sold it to Parker Brothers as Monopoly. The company bought Magie's patent for the original game for $500 and no royalties.
    5. Windshield Wipers

    Drivers were skeptical when Mary Anderson invented the first manual windshield wipers in 1903. They thought it was safer to drive with rain and snow obscuring the road than to pull a lever to clear it. (Another woman inventor, Charlotte Bridgwood, invented an automatic version with an electric roller in 1917. It didn't take off, either.) But by the time Anderson's patent expired in 1920, windshield wipers were cleaning up. Cadillac was the first to include them in every car model, and other companies soon followed.
    6. Disposable Diapers

    Marion Donovan didn't take all the mess out of diaper changing when she patented the waterproof "Boater" in 1951. But she changed parenting—and well, babies—forever. The waterproof diaper cover, originally made with a shower curtain, was first sold at Saks Fifth Avenue. Donovan sold the patent to the Keko Corporation for $1 million and then created an entirely disposable model a few years later. Pampers was born in 1961.
    7. The Dishwasher

    Patented in 1886, the first dishwasher combined high water pressure, a wheel, a boiler, and a wire rack like the ones still used for dish drying. Inventor Josephine Cochrane never used it herself, but it made life easier for her servants.
    8. Liquid Paper

    In the days before the delete key, secretary Bette Nesmith Graham secretly used white tempera paint to cover up her typing errors. She spent years perfecting the formula in her kitchen before patenting Liquid Paper in 1958. Gillette bought her company in 1979 for $47.5 million. And that's no typo.

    More at link.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013
    Last Online
    Friday, September 13th, 2019 @ 6:58 AM
    Posts
    4,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Of course a woman invented disposable diapers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,591
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    Of course a woman invented disposable diapers.
    I thought the same thing!
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 9:11 PM
    Posts
    18,413
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hedy Lamarr worked on several patents but is probably best remembered for helping to create a sort of anti-jamming device for torpedoes in WWII. It was never used then but was much later incorporated into U.S. Navy designs.

    Grace Hopper. Total computer genius. Her work led to COBOL and COBOL/FORTRAN led to everything since humans are essentially crap at machine code.

    In 2012, Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were the first to propose that CRISPR-Cas9 (enzymes from bacteria that control microbial immunity) could be used for programmable editing of genomes, which is now considered one of the most significant discoveries in the history of biology.

    If you think you haven't benefited from CRISPR tools yet, you or somebody you care about will in the next couple of years (you probably already have and just don't know it).
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

  5. Likes scott liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 8:39 AM
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    13,644
    Post Thanks / Like
    8. Liquid Paper

    In the days before the delete key, secretary Bette Nesmith Graham secretly used white tempera paint to cover up her typing errors. She spent years perfecting the formula in her kitchen before patenting Liquid Paper in 1958. Gillette bought her company in 1979 for $47.5 million. And that's no typo.
    I knew that she was Michael Nesmith's mother ("♬ Hey! Hey! We're the Monkees! ♬"), but the story behind it is pretty interesting:

    But demand spiked as her product became a notorious lifesaver for secretaries. In 1956, she coordinated a team to further develop Mistake Out—an office supply dealer, her son’s chemistry teacher, and a paint manufacturer— developing what then became Liquid Paper.

    Things changed dramatically for Graham after that. Her garage business became a patented operation; one single mention in an office trade magazine drew 500 orders from across the country, and an additional 400 in three paper colors from General Electric. Business was booming, but Graham’s poor typing skills eventually got her fired from her day job, which she’d clung onto, when she accidentally typed her homegrown business’s name in a memo that was for her employer.
    WHOOPS!
    Leftists have unquestionably demonstrated their hatred for due process, and Democrats have undeniably obstructed justice for, and thoroughly victim-shamed and smeared, Karen Monahan.

  7. Likes scott liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •