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Thread: We had a lovely dinner in Seattle last month.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norm dePlume View Post
    Here's an interesting article about tipping versus service charges.
    Interesting Slate piece. (What Happens When You Abolish Tipping
    I got rid of gratuities at my restaurant, and our service only got better.) He's welcome to do as he wishes, but I think it's a sham.

    He writes, for example, "When we switched from tipping to a service charge, our food improved, probably because our cooks were being paid more and didn’t feel taken for granted."

    He raised their pay for the same reason Chick-Fil-A raised its pay for workers somewhere out in CA to about $17/hour, I remember reading: to retain those workers and inspire them to contribute their best.

    So Mr. Porter, the author here, has seized the money that would be tip money to make it so.

    Presumably he preserved his own cut from the gross, and everybody's happy.

    He also writes, counter-intuitively and in italics, "our service improved principally because eliminating tips makes it easier to provide good service." He argues, "if you don’t have to always think about money, you can focus on doing your job well," mentions that he has the power to hire and fire,
    Servers are motivated to do a good job in the same ways that everyone else is. Servers want to keep their jobs; servers want to get a raise; servers want to be successful and see themselves as professionals and take pride in their work.
    and uses some lame analogies that tell me he's tried them out with employees over whom he has the power to hire and fire.

    It's true industries that don't depend on tips also find ways to motivate workers and elicit their best efforts.

    So he's not breaking new ground here, he's simply using the tip jar as a money source (rather than simply raising prices, "we switched from tipping to a service charge"), preserving the illusion of competitive prices all the while.

    So after six years he closed his restaurant (the power to hire and fire) and took his ideas to San Francisco. I hope he did well. (The article was published in 2013.) It would be illuminating to find out.

    There's a great sense of self-satisfaction that permeates the article reinforced by numerous links to ancillary arguments, but keeping a restaurant open at all is a huge challenge and a point of pride to owners generally. Kudos are due.
    “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.” —Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff, explaining the Green New Deal for the hard of hearing.

    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman View Post
    Interesting Slate piece. (What Happens When You Abolish Tipping
    I got rid of gratuities at my restaurant, and our service only got better.) He's welcome to do as he wishes, but I think it's a sham.

    He writes, for example, "When we switched from tipping to a service charge, our food improved, probably because our cooks were being paid more and didn’t feel taken for granted."

    He raised their pay for the same reason Chick-Fil-A raised its pay for workers somewhere out in CA to about $17/hour, I remember reading: to retain those workers and inspire them to contribute their best.

    So Mr. Porter, the author here, has seized the money that would be tip money to make it so.

    Presumably he preserved his own cut from the gross, and everybody's happy.

    He also writes, counter-intuitively and in italics, "our service improved principally because eliminating tips makes it easier to provide good service." He argues, "if you don’t have to always think about money, you can focus on doing your job well," mentions that he has the power to hire and fire,
    and uses some lame analogies that tell me he's tried them out with employees over whom he has the power to hire and fire.

    It's true industries that don't depend on tips also find ways to motivate workers and elicit their best efforts.

    So he's not breaking new ground here, he's simply using the tip jar as a money source (rather than simply raising prices, "we switched from tipping to a service charge"), preserving the illusion of competitive prices all the while.

    So after six years he closed his restaurant (the power to hire and fire) and took his ideas to San Francisco. I hope he did well. (The article was published in 2013.) It would be illuminating to find out.

    There's a great sense of self-satisfaction that permeates the article reinforced by numerous links to ancillary arguments, but keeping a restaurant open at all is a huge challenge and a point of pride to owners generally. Kudos are due.
    The inclusion of the SJW angle was interesting ...
    May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
    Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
    And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
    may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    The inclusion of the SJW angle was interesting ...
    It's probably inevitable. Like extreme diets, it seems to come automatically with a large measure of self-righteousness and a compulsion to preach.

    I'm so old. The best models of SJWism were "communes" that sprouted in the heyday of hippies and the like. It didn't have the fascist side, seeking to force society to conform, but it did have the gauzy idealism of a Coke commercial ("I'd like to teach the world to sing. . . .")

    I think there's at least one commune around western NC that has thrived all these years, but most run afoul of human nature. People get tired and lazy; women get stuck (as usual) with children and anxiety about the future, and so on. Serious health issues (dental care?) are a challenge. (And I'm not sure about the NC one. I last read about it several years ago, and I think its membership has been refreshed regularly.)

    Anyway, the trend seems to be moving toward tipping.

    I'm waiting to see a tip jar by every bank teller.
    “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.” —Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff, explaining the Green New Deal for the hard of hearing.

    "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michele View Post
    It's meant to be used by the restaurant for whatever it wants. It doesn't take the place of tipping which goes directly to the people serving the customers. It's a new charge that restaurants have designed to help pay increased labor and benefits costs. That it's in Seattle and Portland should be easy to understand.
    Well, you go right ahead and give an extra twenty percent on top of the service charge just to spite me.

    On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
    -H. L. Mencken

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