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Thread: Full Frontal White Supremacy

  1. #1
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    Full Frontal White Supremacy

    When Bok the Woke was still here and calling me a White Supremacist without providing examples I pressed him on it. I know some of you tired of that and I don't give a shit. He finally tried a lame production of an example and it was an article I copied on here from 'Africaunauthorized" about Cecil Rhodes.

    Meanwhile I have met and gotten to know white Rhodesians that are now both citizens of Zimbabwe and expats in places like Mozambique when family members were murdered and farms taken. I always marveled at how they accepted the results of the situation. TIA - This Is Africa.

    The Carter administration did more than any other American leadership group to undermine whites in Africa. It's fairly simple to look at Rhodesia in the 60's and 70's and compare it via economy and living standards in the 90's and onward to realize the Carter administration, and the rest of the world frankly, hitched their horse to a corrupt wagon.

    Here's another narrative from Africaunauthorized .......

    Lamenting the End of Laughter


    Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me’. This old adage is something I remember from my earliest childhood and in the world that I grew up in it was a way of life. Being half-Afrikaner, did not stop me laughing at my lot; I was brought up on a steady slew of ‘Van der Merwe’ jokes and frequently called a ‘Rock-spider’ so I know all about not taking myself, my history or my ethnicity too seriously.

    Looking back, I suppose that mindset had a lot to do with the culture of the country in which I was born and raised. The Rhodesian way was essentially libertarian in the classical sense in that the emphasis was on the ability of the individual to shape the future rather than the State. The ‘nanny-state’ was unknown. Within this regimen, we were encouraged, at home and within a disciplined and demanding school system, to find the mettle to fight as many of our own battles as possible before reaching out to a higher authority. This was seen as part of the development of the necessary mental and physical toughness needed to deal with the challenges that life would present. Sports such as rugby and cricket were important components teaching us the value of the camaraderie that comes with being part of a team; how to take a knock, dry your eyes and get back on your feet; how to win, and how to accept defeat with grace and in the spirit of good sportsmanship. Throughout this ‘toughening’ process there was also little prohibition on what one said to one another. This burgeoning ribaldry nurtured what I would call, a ‘brotherly irreverence’ where good friends signalled their special bonds by feeling at liberty to speak their minds and laugh at oneself and at one’s real or imagined failings, no matter how dire the situation. A humbling ethos but a binding one, which served as a strong support throughout the troubled times visited upon the country and its people. The unusual ability to laugh in the face of adversity using a tough-love type of humour helped us all through the toughest of challenges.

    Interestingly, because we all grew up interacting on a daily basis with our African countrymen and women, this friendly frankness transcended race and laid the foundation for a successful multi-racial society. All of us grew up experiencing the warmth and comfort that comes with breaking down racial and cultural divides through forming close and rewarding friendships which have endured and strengthened over the years. These relationships were forged through honest social intercourse where we were all comfortable being what we were, mutually aware of all our differences and the fundamental inequalities but also mindful that through open discussion we had a chance to overcome them. And throughout this process we knew how to laugh at, and with one another. When they say. ‘laughter is the best medicine’, I believe they are right.

    In today’s world, dominated by identitarianism, where everyone who is not white, is a potential victim of anything uttered by a white person, that sort of relaxed, robust and often humorous exchange of views and ideas has been outlawed. Replaced by a culture of feigned righteousness where one has to carefully choose words as one navigates through a terminological and verbal minefield leading to serious repercussions following any poorly chosen utterance. ‘Thought Police’ now enforce new rules of social orthodoxy as determined by the intolerant liberal establishment, backed by expanding legislation and naked censorship. The consequence is that everyone now signals virtue by ‘acceptable’ words and deeds, infractions are ruthlessly dealt with, and sometimes referred to a higher authority. We now live in a world of ‘hate crime’ where virtually anything one says, no matter how well meant, might be considered offensive and hurtful and thereby criminal. This has impacted our lives at every level of social interaction. The simple art of conversation has been mutilated into a grotesque fandango across the tight-rope of political correctness, wobbling precariously above the abyss of social, even criminal retribution. Social discourse, public debate and comedy all become especially fraught when venturing anywhere near the matter of race and the slightest mistake might lead to the dreaded accusation of being ‘racist’; this is akin to being fingered in the Salem witch hunt and few, no matter the defence, escape punishment.

    The sad irony, against this lamentable backdrop, is that as a white man who has spent his life interacting with black people, as a boy, as a soldier, as a hunter and in the workplace, I look back whimsically at special times of yore; often a lone white man, sitting in the sand around a fire with black men, having some of the happiest, funniest and most enlightening times of my life.

    In the world I now find myself, outnumbered by sensitive, parochial, prickly, liberally inclined white people, where conversation is constricted by the rules of political correctness, where laughter is seldom heard because someone might be offended, I miss my black friends more than ever.

    As for comedy, the good laughs are gone; like we had watching people like John Cleese. Monty Python, Fawlty Towers, Life of Brian and other performances routinely brought me to tears, lifted my life and made millions around the world laugh. Sadly, Cleese will not humour us again; the liberals have silenced him.

    Cleese says he has been advised not to perform on university campuses because his jokes “might be deemed cruel and offensive”. He goes further: “If you start to think, ‘ooh, we mustn’t criticise or offend them’, humour is gone, with humour goes a sense of proportion, and then as far as I’m concerned we’re living in (Orwell’s dystopian) ‘1984.’”
    If you are interested in what really happened to Rhodesia politically and physically I suggest you read A Handful of Hard Men
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  2. #2
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    The problem with people who apply American urban politics to Africa is that they've never been to Africa. Claiming the entire continent is like South Africa during Apartheid is not only ignorant, but dangerous.

    The really funny part is that most of those types live in very white areas and go to almost all white churches. But the racists are on the right only .
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    The problem with people who apply American urban politics to Africa is that they've never been to Africa. Claiming the entire continent is like South Africa during Apartheid is not only ignorant, but dangerous.

    The really funny part is that most of those types live in very white areas and go to almost all white churches. But the racists are on the right only .
    The only completely and unself-consciously racially integrated church I ever saw was the big MCC in St. Pete. The funny thing was, some of both the black and the white members alternated between that MCC and a much smaller one downtown, not because of racial issues but because the larger congregation was more traditionally mainstream Protestant in the style of the service (sort of blended Episcopalian/Methodist/Presbyterian) while they had been raised Baptist or one of the smaller, more evangelical denominations (Church of God, Nazarene, Holiness, etc.) and missed the more boisterous form of worship.
    No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. This offer VALID in 35 34 33 32 31 26 20 17 15 14 13 ALL 50 states.

    The new 13 original states to stand up for freedom: CA, CT, IA, MA, DE, MN, NH, NY, RI, VT, ME, MD, NJ (plus DC).

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    When I went from NC to OH for college, my roommate was from Buffalo NY. We grew to be fast friends. He took one vacation to go to NC with me, by car. This was around 1970 or 1971. It was a trip full of good stories, most of which I've forgotten.

    One comment of his I remember, though. He professed that he was startled at how many black people there were, generally mixing with whites in every venue. It was true. The area we lived in was about 50% each. (Not the immediate neighborhood, mind. Those were separate for the most part.)

    It was food for thought.
    • “Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your own actions, weakness is pointing your finger at someone else in a time of crisis." — Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, blaming Trump.
    • "We hold these truths to be self evident. All men and women created by the, you know, you know, the thing." —Joe Biden, explaining the Creator.
    • "The way I see it, there's always, c'mon, there's always money. It's there." —Elizabeth Warren, explaining socialism.
    • “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.” —Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff.
    • "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    The problem with people who apply American urban politics to Africa is that they've never been to Africa. Claiming the entire continent is like South Africa during Apartheid is not only ignorant, but dangerous.

    The really funny part is that most of those types live in very white areas and go to almost all white churches. But the racists are on the right only .
    Insightful and accurate my friend. Exactly he reason I couldn't comply with Celeste, someone I call friend and admire, when she told me to just let it go concerning Bok's accusations.

    I personally know people who fought and survived the bush war in Rhodesia. Not all are white. The atrocities are mind boggling on both sides of the battles. The Rhodesian SAS never lost a battle yet they lost the war. ------- Politics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbit View Post
    Insightful and accurate my friend. Exactly he reason I couldn't comply with Celeste, someone I call friend and admire, when she told me to just let it go concerning Bok's accusations.

    I personally know people who fought and survived the bush war in Rhodesia. Not all are white. The atrocities are mind boggling on both sides of the battles. The Rhodesian SAS never lost a battle yet they lost the war. ------- Politics.
    Your call, naturally. I just thought he enjoyed it way too much because he thought he made you mad.
    No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. This offer VALID in 35 34 33 32 31 26 20 17 15 14 13 ALL 50 states.

    The new 13 original states to stand up for freedom: CA, CT, IA, MA, DE, MN, NH, NY, RI, VT, ME, MD, NJ (plus DC).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    Your call, naturally. I just thought he enjoyed it way too much because he thought he made you mad.
    Probably!! And if he's reading this now he's likely chuckling and emailing Norm. If I said nothing it would have represented acceptance of the accusation to him. It became comical at the end when all he could resort to was Trump supporters "reveal themselves with the accusations". I turned that on him on one of his beer fridays and that's when he went on the Cecil Rhodes rant.

    Pretty funny actually considering I walked in many places Rhodes actually also walked. Bok......not so much!
    If it pays, it stays

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