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Thread: Lawyers throwing Molotov cocktails

  1. #1
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    Lawyers throwing Molotov cocktails

    and one of them a Princeton graduate:

    Two lawyers hit with federal charges for throwing Molotov cocktail at NYPD car

    A pair of Brooklyn lawyers are facing federal charges for throwing a Molotov cocktail into a New York Police Department cruiser during riots following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

    Colinford Mattis, 32, a Princeton graduate and member of a New York community board, and Urooj Rahman, 31, a lawyer and Fordham alumnus who recently lost her job, were arrested and charged with attempting to damage or destroy law-enforcement vehicles on Saturday after a surveillance camera recorded the incident.
    It makes me wonder if Princeton and Fordham are teaching everything they need to about professional conduct to its wannabe lawyers.

    ZXVXIQFITBGERDQ4VOP72MQ2JU.jpg

    "Hi, Mom and Dad! You can shred all of this, now."

    Another picture of Ms Rahman, also courtesy of the NY Daily News:

    Last edited by Newman; Sunday, May 31st, 2020 at 9:57 PM.
    • “Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your own actions, weakness is pointing your finger at someone else in a time of crisis." — Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, blaming Trump.
    • "We hold these truths to be self evident. All men and women created by the, you know, you know, the thing." —Joe Biden, explaining the Creator.
    • "The way I see it, there's always, c'mon, there's always money. It's there." —Elizabeth Warren, explaining socialism.
    • “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.” —Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff.
    • "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." —CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.


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    Looks like all the commies are coming out for this street party.

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    What was the purpose of this? How would the average police officer become more inclined to be less violent as a result of being attacked with flaming liquids?

    If somebody threw a fire bomb at my car, I wouldn't stop and think, "Gee, I wonder what that guy's beef is with me? How can I have a dialog to resolve this?".

    The incident would just solidify my low opinion of thugs. Male or female.

    Luckily, I don't have the authority to detain or arrest criminals.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Just a couple of leftist lawyers who want to play out some riot fantasy. You know, pretend we're all badass an' shit. Party time!

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    The NY Bar rules require immediate disbarment upon conviction for a felony. Last I heard, arson was a felony in every state.
    No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. This offer VALID in 35 34 33 32 31 26 20 17 15 14 13 ALL 50 states.

    The new 13 original states to stand up for freedom: CA, CT, IA, MA, DE, MN, NH, NY, RI, VT, ME, MD, NJ (plus DC).

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    As we have seen, however, there is a place in academia for these two. They'll get a nice gig teaching domestic terrorism and they will get tenure.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
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    Quote Originally Posted by phillygirl View Post
    As we have seen, however, there is a place in academia for these two. They'll get a nice gig teaching domestic terrorism and they will get tenure.
    Sadly.

    But I wonder for how much longer?

    I'm getting the impression that both students and parents are more open to non-traditional classroom experiences. In any class, the student will get a dose of the instructor's mindset. In some subjects, that will be more about style or organization, in others it will be more about political/social issue views.

    That wouldn't even be so bad if schools had a more even split between progressive and conservative instructors. My school (back in the Dark Ages) had virtually hysterical progressive profs, most who were uninterested in the topics of the day, and some who were strongly conservative on certain subjects.

    It was an interesting mix and I think everybody should have that experience in Higher Ed. Diversity of viewpoint is more important than diversity of skin tone or sex object.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Sadly.

    But I wonder for how much longer?

    I'm getting the impression that both students and parents are more open to non-traditional classroom experiences.
    The Chinese Death Plague Lockdown taught some students how much money they can save with an online degree.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Sadly.

    But I wonder for how much longer?

    I'm getting the impression that both students and parents are more open to non-traditional classroom experiences. In any class, the student will get a dose of the instructor's mindset. In some subjects, that will be more about style or organization, in others it will be more about political/social issue views.

    That wouldn't even be so bad if schools had a more even split between progressive and conservative instructors. My school (back in the Dark Ages) had virtually hysterical progressive profs, most who were uninterested in the topics of the day, and some who were strongly conservative on certain subjects.

    It was an interesting mix and I think everybody should have that experience in Higher Ed. Diversity of viewpoint is more important than diversity of skin tone or sex object.
    Despite being Jesuit, my school, at least in the poli sci and history depts. So much so, that one of my profs, a retired Col., went on a rant one day about the fact that one of the flaming liberals in the psychology department was an avowed atheist and shouldn't even be there. That atheist teacher, as I recall, was really the only professor I had that was blatantly liberal in his political views in class. We had to read a book about some kind of psychology and it was all about how psychotic Ollie North (I think it may have been North, also could have been someone in the Nixon administration, I can't completely recall now) was in terms of his unquestioning soldier loyalty. I remember thinking at the time, despite not yet being a fully developed conservative (definitely was far more liberal back then) that the book and the professor were idiotic in their approach.

    Mostly, though I felt that we were given the opportunity to think for ourselves, especially when it was Jesuits teaching.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phillygirl View Post
    Despite being Jesuit, my school, at least in the poli sci and history depts. So much so, that one of my profs, a retired Col., went on a rant one day about the fact that one of the flaming liberals in the psychology department was an avowed atheist and shouldn't even be there. That atheist teacher, as I recall, was really the only professor I had that was blatantly liberal in his political views in class. We had to read a book about some kind of psychology and it was all about how psychotic Ollie North (I think it may have been North, also could have been someone in the Nixon administration, I can't completely recall now) was in terms of his unquestioning soldier loyalty. I remember thinking at the time, despite not yet being a fully developed conservative (definitely was far more liberal back then) that the book and the professor were idiotic in their approach.

    Mostly, though I felt that we were given the opportunity to think for ourselves, especially when it was Jesuits teaching.
    My undergrad was religious but not Jesuit. It wasn't utterly secular at that time although it wasn't doctrinal, either. I think I got a great education but that was mostly down to the program I was in. It was the very last class of the Classical Program. You were literally forced to defend positions you did not hold (to hone critical thinking skills), take intensive art or science/math (whatever the opposite of your major was), and you had to read and discuss fundamental Western Civ texts all four years.

    I'll admit I found some of it boring at that point in my life but I've never regretted opting for that program. You just never know when Augustine or Bacon or Kipling will come in handy. Although I'm no artist or performer, I benefited from being taught the basics of art, dance, performance, etc. If I don't like whatever it is, at least I sound intelligent when I explain why I don't like it.

    Creating and defending positions was threaded through most non-math classes. It gave you the habit of mentally testing assertions and either verifying or rejecting them. Not a bad education at all.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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