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Thread: As parents of students look for alternatives, home schooling sees ‘explosive’ interest

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    Apart from the California government's hostility to homeschooling in general, the biggest hurdle I see is the lack of a free online school. Florida had the Florida Virtual School, which, soon after we moved back to CA, even began issuing regular academic diplomas. When we used it, a student could take just about all of her graduation requirements online, but needed to submit the virtual school transcript to her local public school and technically "graduate" from a school she might not ever have attended. Now, I understand a student can actually get an FLVS diploma.

    The beauty of a free, state-provided virtual school is that there's no question that the coursework meets or exceeds state graduation standards. We used it as a supplement to homeschooling. Whenever a course was outside our ability to teach (Honors Algebra II/Trig, for example), HRH did it through virtual school. Also, all Florida schools are required to allow homeschoolers to take anywhere from 1 to most of their classes on campus, so one year, Nova taught English, history, drivers' ed, and science; I taught Honors French 3/4, and HRH took geometry on campus (and loved it, to the point she added a class period to become the geometry teacher's student aide, a credit course). With her JRA, regular PE would have been torture, if not impossible; instead, she took dance through the homeschool co-op. That developed into a personal fitness regime that she maintains to this date.

    I was very anti-homeschool, because I had seen it badly abused. I'm now convinced that people who will use homeschooling to keep their kids from learning would simply subvert their learning if forced to enroll them in regular school. While I would like to see homeschool parents required to pass a basic skills test (not pedagogy, but demonstrate essentially high school equivalent reading, writing, and arithmetic skills), the requirements that California imposes are ridiculous.
    This. Every bit of this.
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

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    Time will tell.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    Apart from the California government's hostility to homeschooling in general, the biggest hurdle I see is the lack of a free online school. Florida had the Florida Virtual School, which, soon after we moved back to CA, even began issuing regular academic diplomas. When we used it, a student could take just about all of her graduation requirements online, but needed to submit the virtual school transcript to her local public school and technically "graduate" from a school she might not ever have attended. Now, I understand a student can actually get an FLVS diploma.

    The beauty of a free, state-provided virtual school is that there's no question that the coursework meets or exceeds state graduation standards. We used it as a supplement to homeschooling. Whenever a course was outside our ability to teach (Honors Algebra II/Trig, for example), HRH did it through virtual school. Also, all Florida schools are required to allow homeschoolers to take anywhere from 1 to most of their classes on campus, so one year, Nova taught English, history, drivers' ed, and science; I taught Honors French 3/4, and HRH took geometry on campus (and loved it, to the point she added a class period to become the geometry teacher's student aide, a credit course). With her JRA, regular PE would have been torture, if not impossible; instead, she took dance through the homeschool co-op. That developed into a personal fitness regime that she maintains to this date.

    I was very anti-homeschool, because I had seen it badly abused. I'm now convinced that people who will use homeschooling to keep their kids from learning would simply subvert their learning if forced to enroll them in regular school. While I would like to see homeschool parents required to pass a basic skills test (not pedagogy, but demonstrate essentially high school equivalent reading, writing, and arithmetic skills), the requirements that California imposes are ridiculous.
    My wife teaches at a virtual public school and has since its inception. It is free in the sense it is a public school. Pre-COVID, the student body was a combination of high performing athletes, actors, social outcasts, and Muslims (big problem with bullying in Texas). There is also a quasi-homeschool contingent.

    The people most hostile to the school, and work to shut it down, are the Trump/Tea Party people.
    “White people were, and are, astounded by the holocaust in Germany. They did not know that they could act that way. But I very much doubt whether black people were astounded ..."

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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Jingo View Post
    My wife teaches at a virtual public school and has since its inception. It is free in the sense it is a public school. Pre-COVID, the student body was a combination of high performing athletes, actors, social outcasts, and Muslims (big problem with bullying in Texas). There is also a quasi-homeschool contingent.

    The people most hostile to the school, and work to shut it down, are the Trump/Tea Party people.
    That's Texas; this is California. I don't frankly know who wrote the anti-home schooling laws in California (they've been in place, AFAIK, at least since Deukmejian was governor), nor do I care. I don't know who is responsible for the lack of a free, public online school, nor do I care. California does many things well. This is not one of them.
    No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. This offer VALID in 35 34 33 32 31 26 20 17 15 14 13 ALL 50 states.

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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    That's Texas; this is California. I don't frankly know who wrote the anti-home schooling laws in California (they've been in place, AFAIK, at least since Deukmejian was governor), nor do I care. I don't know who is responsible for the lack of a free, public online school, nor do I care. California does many things well. This is not one of them.
    I thought that Florida's homeschool + virtual + math tutor = homeschool was pretty seamless. Of course, I wasn't aware of anything you did in the background. All I know is that it worked, but then Godzilla of St Pete Beach was a good guide especially for the recreational and social networking. I'm pretty sure that neither Godzilla nor her husband was/is a Trump supporter or a Tea Party member.
    When the New Deal was established it exempted agricultural and domestic workers. A clothing boxer earned $10/week minimum and a cleaning woman or laundress full time was $2/wk. This brief time is our cultural memory of a more genteel middle class.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Jingo View Post
    My wife teaches at a virtual public school and has since its inception. It is free in the sense it is a public school. Pre-COVID, the student body was a combination of high performing athletes, actors, social outcasts, and Muslims (big problem with bullying in Texas). There is also a quasi-homeschool contingent.

    The people most hostile to the school, and work to shut it down, are the Trump/Tea Party people.
    Got any references for these Trump/Tea Party people working to shut down the virtual public school?
    "What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer."

    link

    Time will tell.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott View Post
    Got any references for these Trump/Tea Party people working to shut down the virtual public school?
    I'd like to see those citations myself. Not saying it's impossible or anything (nothing is) but the TEA party people I've known either don't care about public school alternatives or have a problem with the curriculum which isn't the same as a problem with the tech.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Jingo View Post
    My wife teaches at a virtual public school and has since its inception. It is free in the sense it is a public school. Pre-COVID, the student body was a combination of high performing athletes, actors, social outcasts, and Muslims (big problem with bullying in Texas). There is also a quasi-homeschool contingent.

    The people most hostile to the school, and work to shut it down, are the Trump/Tea Party people.
    Sounds like what is called an Opportunity School out here.
    May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
    Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
    And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
    may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

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  9. #38
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    Our Catholic schools have been suffering financially. Looks like they are about to see a boost in enrollment as our public schools are barely opening this fall. Lots of working parents can't manage the homeschool/virtual/hybrid programs that are about to go in to place. This will probably be one of those unexpected windfalls to come out of COVID. The Catholic schools are much smaller in terms of classes and class size and apparently are better equipped to handle a full on reopening than the large public schools. I think the public schools around here are trying their best to figure out a safe way to reopen, but it just can't satisfy the need for some of the working parents to have their kids in an actual school full time for those whose kids aren't old enough to be left alone all day.
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