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Thread: Here are some commonly used terms that actually have racist origins

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    Here are some commonly used terms that actually have racist origins


    Here are some commonly used terms that actually have racist origins
    Good Morning America
    OLIVIA EUBANKS
    Good Morning America July 30, 2020

    In ​the midst of a cultural awakening on race, commonly used words and phrases and their origins are being reexamined and, in some cases, redefined entirely.

    Still others, such as “peanut gallery” and “fuzzy wuzzy," remain in wide use despite their racially questionable origins.That's because the definition of these words and phrases have often been lost over time, experts said.

    “There is racism embedded throughout our language system just like every other system," said Jeffrey Barg, a Philadelphia Inquirer columnist, known as The Angry Grammarian told ABC News. “We need to dig deeper and understand where the phrases and words we use come from because if we don’t we are being complicit in perpetuating the racist systems that are embedded in our language.”

    To say these phrases and words are ‘just expressions’ or to say ‘the intent of using the word is ‘not meant to be racist’ is not good enough Barg explained.

    “You have to consider how someone else feels when you use these terms.”

    Although not a comprehensive list, here is a list of some commonly used phrases and their origins as identified by experts ABC News spoke with.

    Open the kimono
    "What’s striking about ‘open the kimono’ is how clearly rude it is” Alan Conor Author of The Crossword Century and The Joy of Quiz told ABC News.

    A kimono is associated with formal attire in Japanese culture, over time this 1970’s-era slang has been misinterpreted from myths that certain Japanese warriors would open their robes to show someone that they were not hiding their weapons. Kimonos were also worn by geishas--highly trained hostesses who throughout history have been inaccurately depicted as concubines in various films and books.

    Both amplify a stereotypical view of Japanese culture.

    “This shows how in our language the simplified notions of other cultures get wrapped up in expressions we use.” John Kelly, senior research editor at Dictionary.com explained. Today, the phrase is a way of talking about revealing corporate information.

    “It’s used without a lot of thought about its literal meaning, and I’m sure that there are people who, if reminded how predatory it sounds, would tee-hee rather than blush.” Conor continued.
    I have never actually heard this term. The explanation about warriors is ludicrous. A more useful explanation has to do with women's clothing in certain eras. Wealthy women (not simply geisha or courtesans) wore many layers of kimono with just the edges showing to demonstrate their affluence and status.

    The kimono were made of thin silk. If you wanted to see the reality of the woman, she might have to open as many as 10 kimono - something like those Russian nested dolls.

    The rest of the article is about the same.

    Via Yahoo
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear, not an African tribesperson.

    Using the word ‘plantation’ romanticizes the old South, a slave economy," Kelly explained “When white people hear the word ‘plantation’ they may think of a big white house with pillars and southern oak trees. But when a Black person hears that word, it evokes a past of slavery.”


    I can't control when Black people choose to get upset. With even a minimum of historical digging this shithead would have discovered that "plantation" only means farm, that "Plimoth Plantations" was in Massachusetts, that GWTW was not a flucking documentary.

    he writes that “Peanut gallery was in use in the 1880s, as a synonym for n----- gallery (1840s) or n----- heaven (1870s), the upper balcony where blacks sat, as in segregated theaters.”

    And we never got the memo. "Peanut Gallery" has always meant children often as an insult to adults.

    I swear, the people who write this crap just make it up as they go along.

    Paddy Wagon

    This 19th century slang was used historically to reference Irish immigrants who upon being arrested were put in a police van, called a ‘Paddy Wagon."“The idea of ‘paddy’ is a police car that comes around to grab up Irish people who are no good drunk criminals, so it deals with a historical stereotype of Irish people as low lives, Kelly told ABC News.


    How inclusive.

    The phrase “criss-cross apple sauce” is used in place of the phrase "sit Indian style"


    Somebody slap the jackass that came up with that.

    Mumbo jumbo

    Means talking unintelligibly or ridiculously. Every country in the world makes fun of other languages. Olivia "Do these glasses make me smarter than a gourd?" Eubanks is full of it.
    When the New Deal was established it exempted agricultural and domestic workers. A clothing boxer earned $10/week minimum and a cleaning woman or laundress full time was $2/wk. This brief time is our cultural memory of a more genteel middle class.

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    From Nova:

    The phrase “criss-cross apple sauce” is used in place of the phrase "sit Indian style"


    Somebody slap the jackass that came up with that.
    Yeah, never heard that in my life. In fact, I'm not sure I ever heard "sit Indian style". Out here, people just say, "sit cross-legged on the floor". Everybody knows what this means.

    Howdy Doody was before my time but the term "peanut gallery" always meant kids. If there was some kind of mixed (adult and kid) event, kids would get banished to the gallery so their folks could enjoy whatever it was in peace. I always assumed it had to with kids often being called "Peanut" by adults.

    I heard it enough from stray relatives and neighbors.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Yeah, never heard that in my life. In fact, I'm not sure I ever heard "sit Indian style". Out here, people just say, "sit cross-legged on the floor". Everybody knows what this means.

    Howdy Doody was before my time but the term "peanut gallery" always meant kids. If there was some kind of mixed (adult and kid) event, kids would get banished to the gallery so their folks could enjoy whatever it was in peace. I always assumed it had to with kids often being called "Peanut" by adults.

    I heard it enough from stray relatives and neighbors.
    When I was a child, "sit like an Indian" meant on the floor with legs crossed in front. The "colored balcony" was not the peanut gallery.
    When the New Deal was established it exempted agricultural and domestic workers. A clothing boxer earned $10/week minimum and a cleaning woman or laundress full time was $2/wk. This brief time is our cultural memory of a more genteel middle class.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingersnap View Post
    Yeah, never heard that in my life. In fact, I'm not sure I ever heard "sit Indian style". Out here, people just say, "sit cross-legged on the floor". Everybody knows what this means.

    Howdy Doody was before my time but the term "peanut gallery" always meant kids. If there was some kind of mixed (adult and kid) event, kids would get banished to the gallery so their folks could enjoy whatever it was in peace. I always assumed it had to with kids often being called "Peanut" by adults.

    I heard it enough from stray relatives and neighbors.
    In the Howdy TV show it had no other meaning. The kids who got on the show weren't a group of nappy haired African decedents.

    I have been told to sit cross legged Indian style and did associate it with the movie lore of Indians but now that I think of it, it's more related to the country of India. That's F****** RACIST...
    Robert Francis O'Rourke, Democrat, White guy, spent ~78 million to defeat, Ted Cruz, Republican immigrant Dark guy …
    and lost …
    But the Republicans are racist.

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    Obviously Charles Schulz was a racist. Good grief.

    This nonsense angers me. It's an exercise in "social justice literacy," the game of seeing the enemy everywhere.

    How's this: I want to keep terms like "paddy wagon" in the language precisely because it has an ethnic origin that reveals a nugget of history. It enriches the language.

    A lot of these terms are wordplay, alliteration or repetitive vowels, like fuzzy wuzzy and mumbo jumbo. They're about as evil as "busy as a bee."

    By the way, this "Angry Grammarian" needs to go "whole hog" (offensive to hogs):

    The word "Yankee" comes from an insult to the early Dutch settlers of New York, who were derisively called "John Cheese" in a mock accent, and reflected their fondness for cheese.

    The word "barbarian" was a mocking imitation of the language of the brutes at the gate, which sounded like "bar bar bar..." to the besieged.

    Assholes like the Angry Grammarian would make our language, and probably the whole world, the bland, washed out carcass the Washington Redskins have become.

    What an immature stinker.
    • “Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your own actions, weakness is pointing your finger at someone else in a time of crisis." — Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, blaming Trump.
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    We used to say to sit Indian style.

    As for 'peanut gallery'...I've always used it to denote those that are not engaged in the debate or discussion, but instead are throwing out wisecracks or are laughing or chuckling at someone who is taking the brunt of the argument. "Quit playing to the peanut gallery"...meaning simply the spectators, rather than the main players.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phillygirl View Post
    We used to say to sit Indian style.

    As for 'peanut gallery'...I've always used it to denote those that are not engaged in the debate or discussion, but instead are throwing out wisecracks or are laughing or chuckling at someone who is taking the brunt of the argument. "Quit playing to the peanut gallery"...meaning simply the spectators, rather than the main players.
    Exactly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
    Exactly.
    My old partner always yelled at me in office debates for playing to the peanut gallery. I know it might surprise you, but sometimes I like to make the debate entertaining via zingers and sarcasm.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

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    I remember as a kid being told in class that we need to sit "indian style" when on the floor. Once my niece got into school, it was "criss cross, apple sauce." I guess I get the criss cross, but not apple sauce. lol.

    I was an adult before I learned that terms like Jap, uppity, lazy, eskimo, and certain other things were racist.

    Mumbo Jumbo? I'll have to remember that because I have used that term in the past to talk about stuff that I think of as stupid.
    With over 157K deaths to COVID-19, these Chinese sending us seeds to hurt us, and expecting kids to practice social distancing in school in ways adults can't, welcome to level eight.

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