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Thread: The ‘Resistance,’ Raising Big Money, Upends Liberal Politics

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    Cool The ‘Resistance,’ Raising Big Money, Upends Liberal Politics

    The ‘Resistance,’ Raising Big Money, Upends Liberal Politics

    The New York Times | By KENNETH P. VOGEL | 2 days ago

    WASHINGTON — It started as a scrappy grass-roots protest movement against President Trump, but now the so-called resistance is attracting six- and seven-figure checks from major liberal donors, posing an insurgent challenge to some of the left’s most venerable institutions — and the Democratic Party itself.

    The jockeying between groups, donors and operatives for cash and turf is occurring mostly behind the scenes. But it has grown acrimonious at times, with upstarts complaining they are being boxed out by a liberal establishment that they say enables the sort of Democratic timidity that paved the way for the Trump presidency.

    The tug of war — more than the lingering squabbles between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont — foreshadows a once-in-a-generation reorganization of the American left that could dictate the tactics and ideology of the Democratic Party for years to come. If the newcomers prevail, they could pull the party further to the left, leading it to embrace policy positions like those advocated by Mr. Sanders, including single-payer healthcare and free tuition at public colleges.

    The upending of the left comes amid a broader realignment in American politics, with the Republican Party establishment also contending with a rising rebellion, driven by pro-Trump populists. Just as the new forces on the right are threatening primary challenges to establishment Republicans, some groups on the left have begun talking about targeting Democratic incumbents in the 2018 midterm elections.

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    I don't think people left of center realize just how bad this would be for the Democrats. If they move further left, they're embracing a fringe that is a distinct minority in this country. They can't expect to mimic the Republican lurch towards popularism because it's a different beast that appeals to a mass audience.

    If you're a right winger, though… this is probably the best thing that could happen to the opposition. They embrace the Sanders sector, they will crater… and hard.
    I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Servo View Post
    I don't think people left of center realize just how bad this would be for the Democrats. If they move further left, they're embracing a fringe that is a distinct minority in this country. They can't expect to mimic the Republican lurch towards popularism because it's a different beast that appeals to a mass audience.

    If you're a right winger, though… this is probably the best thing that could happen to the opposition. They embrace the Sanders sector, they will crater… and hard.
    Pretty much.

    I saw this yesterday in Politico (Alan Greenblatt).

    Are Democrats Headed for a McGovern Redux?

    As Trump continues his Nixonian campaign of white cultural-grievance politics, Democrats appear consumed by the same squabbles that destroyed them in 1972.


    Mr. (probably) Greenblatt splits his time in this piece between "virtue signaling" his disdain for the awful Trump, and analysis of the self-destructive compulsion of the Democrats.
    [Paragraph 4] Consumed by internecine battles and the idea of opposition, Democrats run the risk of again nominating someone like McGovern who pleases progressives but steers a course too far from the country’s center of political gravity to win, even as Trump continues his funhouse mirror impression of Nixon as the avatar of white cultural-grievance politics.
    Democrats are really only starting the debate among themselves about whether they can achieve better results without changing their electoral strategy or demographic formula. Last month, [co-author with Ruy Teixeira of The Emerging Democratic Majority John B.] Judis published a mea culpa in The New Republic for having suggested that demographics inevitably favor Democrats. Since November, Democrats have continually consoled themselves with the knowledge that Hillary Clinton beat Trump by nearly 3 million votes. That only meant that for the second time in five elections, a popular vote victory wasn’t good enough in the Electoral College. “While Democrats are advantaged by how demographics are changing and have a hold on the future,” says political demographer (and Judis’ former co-author) Ruy Teixeira, “the way the population is divided up and distributed around the country is not to their advantage.”

    In terms of rules changes, there’s next to no chance the party’s current Unity Review Commission—meant to resolve disputes left over from last year about superdelegates and other nominating procedures—will have the same impact as McGovern’s. But as in the run up to 1972, the progressive wing of the party, having lost the previous nomination battle, is again setting the terms of debate for the next one, in terms of ideology if not procedure. Sanders is having a much bigger effect on the party’s direction than the actual prior nominee, with his Our Revolution group endorsing progressive candidates around the country and Sanders persuading a majority of the Senate Democratic caucus to sign on to his Medicare for All health-care bill. “If the Democrats move to the left and focus on free tuition for college and single-payer health care,” says Fredrik Logevall, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian of Vietnam, “I do get 1972 popping into my head.”
    Barack Obama was the Robert E. Lee of the Democratic Party. Talented, admired (adulated), a model of personal probity, he led his troops through improbable victories, while the cause crumbled invisibly underneath, and when he left office, or surrendered at Appomattox, his troops were starving such that the enemy soldiers shared their rations with them.

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    To stretch that comparison for one more moment, it's well to recall the obituaries written for the losing political Party in 1964, or 1972.

    Projecting a trend arithmetically is tempting and always foolish. At some point the Democratic Party will rebound. But it's not a given that things for them won't get worse before they get better, nor is it a given that they will return to being the dominant national party they used to be.

    Likewise, it's silly to pretend the GOP is a monolith, imposing some sort of new agenda on the country. If ever there was an internecine battle in a majority party, the Republicans are putting on first rate model of how it's done. I'd almost expect some GOP equivalent of the Dixiecrats to break off.

    In this triumvirate of power centers, the most misunderestimated player is Donald Trump. The NeverTrumpsters, the Resistance, the Not My President dead enders, or merely the progressive Democrats, are still blinded by their frustration.

    I was fascinated to see this ESPN anchor twist his way through some very falacious reasoning (in my opinion) to reach a clear conclusion about the president and the NFL: Trump won.

    Stephen A. Smith Says Trump Is ‘Winning’ The National Anthem Debate

    Likewise with his new DACA proposal, and as he has done time and time again, he puts a tar baby in front of the Democrats and they simply cannot resist swinging.

    Going after red-state Democrats
    ...President Trump is tying DACA to border security. Why is he doing that? This is what I think:

    1) There are several Democrats seeking reelection in places like Montana, North Dakota, Missouri, Indiana, and West Virginia. President Trump did very well in those states. Furthermore, it's a tough map for Democrats in 2018 and DACA does not make it easier;

    2) Most of the dreamers live in 5 states: California, Texas, New York, Illinois and Florida; and,

    3) It's fair to say that senators and congressmen in the other 45 states are likely to get more pressure to vote for the wall than DACA.
    President Trump has put many of the Democrats in these red states in a very tough situation. They will have to support border security if they want DACA.

    This is a brilliant move by President Trump and it should pay off with a final product that accomplishes his immigration objectives.
    I suspect TN Sen. Bob Corker might have some empathy for ESPN's Stephen Smith.
    Last edited by Newman; Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 at 7:15 AM.

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    Yet another example of how clueless these pundits are. No, it has nothing to do with Trump not owning a football team now.

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    Wouldn't it be something if a second tier talent like Colin Kaepernick turns out to be the most influential player in the history of the game?


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    All the things some of you claimed to dislike in the previous president with zero evidence, the lies, the narcissism, the empty suit, the incompetence, he was racially divisive, etc, are all demonstrably manifested daily in the current president and you laud it. You cheer his incompetence; you cheer his deliberate division of this nation on racial and cultural lines; you cheer his pathological narcissism; you cheer his lies.

    I do not understand you people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Jingo View Post
    All the things some of you claimed to dislike in the previous president with zero evidence, the lies, the narcissism, the empty suit, the incompetence, he was racially divisive, etc, are all demonstrably manifested daily in the current president and you laud it. You cheer his incompetence; you cheer his deliberate division of this nation on racial and cultural lines; you cheer his pathological narcissism; you cheer his lies.

    I do not understand you people.
    It could be worse. Hillary could be president.

    Mark
    Race Card: A tool of the intellectually weak and lazy when they cannot counter a logical argument or factual data.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Jingo View Post
    All the things some of you claimed to dislike in the previous president with zero evidence, the lies, the narcissism, the empty suit, the incompetence, he was racially divisive, etc, are all demonstrably manifested daily in the current president and you laud it. You cheer his incompetence; you cheer his deliberate division of this nation on racial and cultural lines; you cheer his pathological narcissism; you cheer his lies.

    I do not understand you people.
    I called him "misunderestimated." And I think that's true.

    I was in NY when he rebuilt the ice skating rink in Central Park. The scorn and derision were in the air then, too. He's NOT incompetent, but in elective politics he's inexperienced. He did win, though, and that doesn't happen by accident.

    And where you see "zero evidence" of fault in Obama, I see much less at fault than you do with the Donald. The left/right divide being what it is these days, I doubt either of us will convert the other, except maybe around the edges.

    I'll settle for the shoe being on the other foot for awhile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman View Post
    And where you see "zero evidence" of fault in Obama, I see much less at fault than you do with the Donald.


    Bullshit.

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